Red Hind

Red Hind

Epinephelus guttatus

Managed by:

SAFMC


Physical description:

The red hind and the rock hind, Epinephelus adscensionis, are both characterized by numerous dark spots on a lighter background. This color feature alone distinguishes the two from the speckled hind. The red hind have pale pink bodies with uniform red spots. The back and the sides lack the large black blotches or saddles that are seen on rock hind, and the soft-rayed portions of the dorsal and anal fins as well as caudal fin are margined in black.


Biological description:

The species is found in tropical and subtropical waters as deep as 400 feet, from North Carolina to Brazil, including the southern part of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. It is most abundant off Bermuda and in the West Indies. Red hind are protogynous hermaphrodites. Spawning occurs from March to July, and females release an average of 90 thousand to 3 million pelagic eggs. The species may live up to 17 years or longer, and reach a length of 23 inches and a weight of 10 pounds. Red hind feed on small fishes, crabs, shrimps and squid. Red hind will hide in holes and crevices and capture their prey by ambush.


South Atlantic Federal Regulations

Commercial:

  • CLOSED, effective January 1, 2017. The fishery will reopen on May 1, 2017.
  • Size Limit:  Otherwise, none
  • Trip Limit:  No trip limit.
  • Regulatory Remarks:
    • Annual Shallow-water Grouper Spawning Season Closure January 1 through April 30. Prohibition on recreational and commercial harvest or possession of: gag, black grouper, red grouper, scamp, red hind, rock hind, coney, graysby, yellowfin grouper, and yellowmouth grouper.
    • All species must be landed with head and fins intact.
    • Recreational and commercial fishermen are required to use dehooking tools when fishing for snapper grouper species.
    • The use of non-stainless steel circle hooks (offset or non-offset) is required for all species in the snapper grouper complex when using hook-and-line gear with natural baits in waters North of 28 degress N. latitude.
    • After the commercial quota is met, all purchase and sale is prohibited and harvest and/or possession is limited to the recreational bag limit. This prohibition does not apply to fish harvested, landed, and sold prior to the quota being reached and held in cold storage by a dealer. Quotas are given in gutted weights.
    • Commercial snapper grouper vessels must have onboard NMFS approved sea turtle release gear and follow smalltooth sawfish release protocol. See the Handling and Release Protocol from NOAA Fisheries or call 727-824-5312.
    • Annual Catch Limit (ACL) -This species is managed under an ACL. See current information on Commercial ACLs (quotas) from NOAA Fisheries.
  • Additional Updates:

Recreational:

  • CLOSED, effective January 1, 2017. The fishery will reopen on May 1, 2017.
  • Size Limit:  None
  • Trip Limit:  Included in the Aggregate Grouper Bag Limit of 3 grouper per person/day
  • Regulatory Remarks:
    • Included in Aggregate Grouper bag limit of 3 groupers per person/day. Aggregate species include: gag, black, snowy, misty, red, scamp, yellowedge, yellowfin, yellowmouth grouper; blueline, sand, golden tilefish; coney, graysby, red hind and rock hind.
    • Annual Shallow-water Grouper Spawning Season Closure January 1 through April 30. Prohibition on recreational and commercial harvest or possession of: gag, black grouper, red grouper, scamp, red hind, rock hind, coney, graysby, yellowfin grouper, and yellowmouth grouper.
    • All species must be landed with head and fins intact.
    • Recreational and commercial fishermen are required to use dehooking tools when fishing for snapper grouper species.
    • The use of non-stainless steel circle hooks (offset or non-offset) is required for all species in the snapper grouper complex when using hook-and-line gear with natural baits in waters North of 28 degress N. latitude.
    • The sale of bag-limit caught snapper grouper species is prohibited.
    • Annual Catch Limit (ACL) - This species is managed under an ACL. See current information on Recreational ACLs from NOAA Fisheries.
  • Additional Updates: